Entries NOW OPEN for the Deadly New Dads video comp

What’s it all about?

Are you a soon-to-be-dad or have a bub under 12 months old? Here’s your chance to win $3,000!

 Soon-to-be and new First Nations dads are invited to submit a short video (under 2 minutes) showcasing what they love about being or becoming a new dad. 

WHAT SHOULD YOUR VIDEOS BE ABOUT?

There are two themes to choose from to base your video content on

CATEGORY ONE     Soon-To-Be Dads (expecting fathers)

OR

CATEGORY TWO    Dads & Their Bubs (for new dads with a baby under 1 year old).


GET YOUR ENTRY IN NOW!!  Don’t miss out – total prize pool of $10,000 

The Deadly New Dads Video Comp is proudly supported by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet & SMS4dads

TOTAL PRIZE POOL OF $10,000

THEME : SOON-TO-BE DADS 

WHAT’S DEADLY ABOUT BECOMING A DAD

First Nations fathers whose partner is going to have a baby are invited to record and upload a short home-made video clip showing, “ What’s important to you now you have found out you are becoming a dad?” or “What are you looking forward to doing with your bub?” 

THEME : DADS & THEIR BUBS

SOMETHING YOU LOVE DOING WITH YOUR NEW BUB

First Nations fathers whose baby is less than 1 year of age are invited to record and upload a short home-made fatherhood video clip showing, “What is something you love about being a dad?“or“What is something you like doing with your bub?“  

PEOPLE'S CHOICE 

ON-LINE VOTING

On-Line Voting for People’s Choice Award opens at 10:00am AEST on Friday 29 July 2022 via SMS4dads.com

JUDGING CRITERIA

Video entries will be judged by a selected panel based on:  

  • Quality – overall impression of the video 
  • Content reflecting the theme ‘Strengths of our young First Nations fathers’ 
  • Content reflecting rural and remote locations 

For tips and tricks on video techniques click here

Richard’s research revealed possible long-term negative impacts on the children of dads with mental health issues. Fathers’ depressive symptoms in the first year after the birth predicted behaviour problems in their children years later.

“If dads’ mental health has such a dramatic impact then we need to be screening dads for depression, not just mums,” Richard explains.

In response to these limitations, Richard and his team have designed a smart-phone based program that allows mobile connection for new and expectant dads.

Participants receive texts containing information and links, and self-report their mood. If the mood tracker identifies dads as needing extra support, they will be offered a phone call from a counsellor trained in this area.

Following the success of the pilot of the SMS4dads program, Funding was received to enable a National roll-out.

“When dad’s miss antenatal classes or activities, they also miss out on contact and links to other people.  They may never get the chance to say to anyone, look I’m really stressed,” he points out.

“SMS4dads is a way of bringing dads into the health system and keeping them linked in with services and support,” explains Richard.

Richard Fletcher

Associate Professor, PhD

Richard credits a varied career, a talented and innovative team, and much life experience for affording him the insight needed to address the challenges related to actively engaging dads.

After completing his masters in Medical Science, studying epidemiology, Richard earned his PhD focusing on fathers and attachment.

“Fathers are invisible in many places, and that is endemic. Not because people dislike fathers, but because the system is set up to be focused on mothers.”

Some services and organisations are aware of the need to engage dads, but have been unsuccessful in their attempts.

“When people are challenged about this, they generally want dads involved,” Richard affirms.

“Often, however, they just don’t know how to do it.”

Richard works with health professionals on issues related to fathers, and has delivered many antenatal programs for expectant dads.

He credits his own family with giving him an understanding of the role of fathers needed to make his work relevant.

“I have three daughters and two stepdaughters,”

“My kids would say they taught me just about everything I know and they’d be right. They’ve taught me a lot, and still do.”

Richard’s research revealed possible long-term negative impacts on the children of dads with mental health issues. Fathers’ depressive symptoms in the first year after the birth predicted behaviour problems in their children years later.

“If dads’ mental health has such a dramatic impact then we need to be screening dads for depression, not just mums,” Richard explains.

In response to these limitations, Richard and his team have designed a smart-phone based program that allows mobile connection for new and expectant dads.

Participants receive texts containing information and links, and self-report their mood. If the mood tracker identifies dads as needing extra support, they will be offered a phone call from a counsellor trained in this area.

Following the success of the pilot of the SMS4dads program, Funding was received to enable a National roll-out.

“When dad’s miss antenatal classes or activities, they also miss out on contact and links to other people.  They may never get the chance to say to anyone, look I’m really stressed,” he points out.

“SMS4dads is a way of bringing dads into the health system and keeping them linked in with services and support,” explains Richard.